Cooperation with INFN on the DarkSide-20k experiment

On 2 October 2021 our colleague Dr Marek Walczak (research group 1) returned from a scientific trip to the National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) in Genoa, Italy. He spent three intensive weeks there working on testing the veto Photo Detector Modules and developing software for analyzing data from the tested setups. All this time he collaborated with other INFN scientists from Gemma Testera’s group: Bianca Bottino, Alessio Caminata, Simone Copello and Stefano Davini.

“Rewolucja Stanu” — comics about Quantum Informatics co-authored by Prof. Piotr Gawron

The book consists of two parts: the first is comic and the second is scientific. The storyline of the comic part takes place in some undefined future, ruled by an organisation that guards access to knowledge. In this world quantum informatics has developed, but at the same time it is treated as a forbidden art. In the story, a certain organisation is trying to gain access to all the knowledge accumulated by Humanity. But to do so, they have to steal quantum cryptographic keys…

Scientific Awards of “Polityka”

Dr Sebastian Trojanowski from the Particle Astrophysics group has been placed among the 15 finalists of the 21. edition of the scientific award “Nagroda Naukowa Polityki” organised by the major Polish weekly “Polityka”. Scientific Awards of “Polityka” are scholarships for young Polish scientists to encourage their work in different scientific disciplines. Dr Trojanowski is this year’s finalists in physics.

Unique infrasound sensor has been developed at AstroCeNT

Group 2 led by Prof. Bulik and group 3 led by Dr. Suchenk have developed  a unique infrasound sensor. It will find its application both in cutting-edge scientific research and commercial projects.
“While most commercial solutions are very expensive, we have managed to significantly reduce the cost of such a solution, which is crucial in applications where tens or even hundreds of precise sensors are needed.”

AstroCeNT group leaders about 2020

“We have learned how to use new tools and how manage our work in this difficult year. Now we look into the future.
We have ambitious plans: we want to be able to predict the shape of gravitational wave signals; we want to understand the seismic noise impacting gravitational wave detectors; we want to develop quantum machine learning techniques for space observations.
We will look for ambitious PhD students willing to help us in these scientific endeavors.
We hope that 2021 will be a good year for science – the one we do out of pure curiosity and the one that makes our lives better”.